Photo of the day (165): Naesiotus

Andrew Kraemer, postdoc at Idaho University, is studying land snails belonging to “the most species-rich group of animals in the Galapagos, the snail genus Naesiotus”. He posted several beautiful pictures on his blog, and Flickr pages, some of which I here reproduce to share them with you.

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Naesiotus cf. perrus (Dall, 1917), Fernandina

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Naesiotus cf. pallidus (Reibisch, 1892), Isabela

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Naesiotus eos (Odhner, 1951), Santa Cruz

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Naesiotus tortuganus (Dall, 1893), Isabela

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Naesiotus ochseni (Dall, 1917), Santa Cruz

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Naesiotus asperatus (Albers, 1857), Floreana

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Naesiotus rabidensis (Dall, 1917), Rabida

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Naesiotus nux (Broderip, 1832), Floreana

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Naesiotus unifasciatus (Reibisch, 1892), Floreana

And of course, this is but a small part of the total number of snail species in this archipelago. For background information on the diversification, see Parent & Crespi (2006), who erroneously used a different genus name.

Reference:
Parent, C.E. & Crespi, B.J. (2006). Sequential colonization and diversification of Galapagos land snail genus Bulimulus (Gastropoda, Stylommatophora). – Evolution 60: 2311-2328.

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