Tag Archives: literature

New Costa Rican euconulids

Just published: a paper by Barrientos with new data on Costa Rican Euconulidae. The abstract is as follows:

Introduction: The family Euconulidae is circumglobal, but only one subfamily, the Euconulinae, occurs in the American continent. Fourteen native euconulids, in three genera, have been reported from Costa Rica.
Objective: In this paper I describe Tikoconus, a new genus of Euconulinae endemic to Costa Rica.
Methods: I dissected alcohol-preserved euconulids collected in Costa Rica. I took photographs or electron micrographs or drew the shell, external anatomy, reproductive system, mantle cavity organs and radula.
Results: The genus Tikoconus can be recognized by its semislug appearance and very thin and often flexible subglobose to subglobose-depressed external shell. Other distinctive features of the genus are a lack of black dots on the mantle and the presence of at least some dark blotches on the subpedal groove band. Internally, the urethra has a Z-shaped prolongation that almost reaches the mantle collar. The reproductive system has a distinctive external C-shaped penial gland that surrounds half of the penis circumference and is attached to the penis and to the penial caecum, but not connected to them by ducts. Also, there is an internal mono- or bi-lobulated extension in the penis. The epiphallus has a verge that enters into the penis. The penial sheath surrounds part of the penis, the epiphallus base and the penial retractor muscle insertion, but leaves the penial gland and the penis caecum free. The gametolytic gland is absent. I described two new subgenera: Tikoconus with six new species-T. (T.) costaricanus sp.n. (type species), T. (T.) onca sp.n., T. (T.) andresi sp.n., T. (T.) katyae sp.n., T. (T.) alosii sp.n., T. (T.) subsilvanus sp.n.; and Bribriconus with only one species-T. (B.) thompsoni sp.n. All species have restricted distributions and are endemic to particular watersheds, except for T. costaricanus which occurs nearly throughout the central mountains of Costa Rican. This genus inhabits very wet, little disturbed tropical forests from 400 to 2 500 masl on the Atlantic slope and from 760 to 2 500 masl on the Pacific slope. The genus Velifera, the other semislug euconulid reported from Costa Rica, is kept as a valid taxon and I choose the specimen ANSP 48765 as lectotype of Velifera gabbi with the purpose of clarifying the application of the name to a taxon.
Conclusion: A new euconulid genus and seven species were described.

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This is thorough paper on this less-known family which occurs in different Neotropical countries. A key is included for the species of the new genus. The paper provides interesting data on the anatomy and ecology of these species, data which are hardly known for other representatives of this family in the Neotropics.

Reference:
Barrientos, Z., 2019. A new genus of semislugs (Stylommatophora: Euconulidae) from Costa Rica and a review of the genus Velifera (Stylommatophora: Euconulidae). Revista de Biologia Tropical, 67 (6): 1313-1358.

Corona from Peru

A short note was published by Schwabe et al. about the finding of Corona regalis (Hupé, 1857) in Central Peru.

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The material contained both dextral and sinistral specimens, and confirmed the eniantomorphism occurring in this species (recently the genetic locus was located in a Lymnaea species).

Reference:
Schwabe, E. et al., 2019. First record from ACP Panguana: The pulmonate genus Corona Albers, 1850. – Spixiana, 41 (1): 8.

El Salvador non-marine molluscs

Ignacio Agudo-Padrón has just published a short paper with a list of land and freshwater species from El Salvador. Although most data are contained in the overview by Thompson (2011), two species are listed now as a new for the territory: Bulimulus corneus (G.B. Sowerby I, 1833) and Orthalicus maclurae Martens, 1893.

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The paper is illustrated with several photographs of live snails (Drymaeus discrepans (G.B. Sowerby I, 1833) above) and the species list contains 30 names, based on an inventory made by the government of El Salvador in 2016.

Reference:
Agudo-Padrón, I., 2019. Los moluscos no marinos ocurrentes en El Salvador, América Central: una breve revisión panorámica introductoria de su actual conocimiento. – Bioma (El Salvador), 5: 48–53.
Thompson, F.G., 2011. An annotated checklist and bibliography of the land and freshwater snails of México and Central América. – Bulletin Florida Museum Natural History, 50(1): 1–303.

Revision of Hyperaulax

Freshly pressed: a paper by Salvador & Cavallari on the Brazilian genus Hyperaulax. “The genus Hyperaulax Pilsbry, 1897 comprises two living species endemic to the oceanic Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, offnorth-eastern Brazil. They are currently allocated in two subgenera, Hyperaulax s. str. and Bonnanius Jousseaume, 1900, belonging to the family Odontostomidae. Herein we present a taxonomic revision of these species, assessing their familiar allocation within Orthalicoidea, offering updated diagnoses and descriptions, figuring the type materials and further relevant specimens, and providing barcoding DNA sequences. We conclude that Bonnanius is a junior synonym of Hyperaulax, which is classified in Odontostomidae.The genus contains two valid species, H. ridleyi and H. ramagei, both endemic to Fernando de Noronha“.

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This genus has been associated also with Floridian fossils for many years, until Auffenbach et al. showed that these fossils belonged to the Bulimulidae. This revision of the two species neatly shows that subgeneric splitting should be avoided.

Reference:
Salvador, B.R. & Cavallari, D.C., 2019. Taxonomic revision of the genus Hyperaulax Pilsbry, 1897 (Gastropoda, Stylommatophora, Odontostomidae). Zoosystema and Evolution, 95 (2): 453–463.

 

Ovachlamys in Brazil

Just published: a report that confirms the occurrence of a new invasive snail in this country. “The occurrence of the invasive non-native Asiatic jumping land snail Helicarionidae Ovachlamys fulgens (Gude, 1900) is finally confirmed by us in the southern Brazil region, specifically on the Santa Catarina State territory, from previous records available since the year 2013 “masked” under the identity of another species. This report increases to 27 the number of exotic continental molluscs confirmed in the State of Santa Catarina/ SC.“.

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Not surprisingly the occurrences are mainly situated near the region where the port activities occur. I wouldn’t be surprised if these snail travel with sea containers, as the distribution of Bulimulus sp. suggests (ongoing research, unpublished data).

Reference:
Aguda-Padron, I., 2019. Confirmed occurrence of the invasive asiatic jumping land microsnail Helicarionidae Ovachlamys fulgens (Gude, 1900) in the Southern Brazil region. – Bioma (El Salvador) 5 (49): 11–15.

Veronicellids recharacterised

Just published: a paper by Rocha & D’ávila on the Veronicellid genera Latipes and Angustipes.

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Their abstract is “The genera Angustipes Colosi, 1922 and Latipes Colosi, 1922 were originally proposed as “groups” within the genus Vaginulus Ferrussac, 1822, and since their establishment they have been variously considered valid or invalid until they gained the ultimate status of genus. The descriptions of both genera are general and broadly inclusive, and this fact has complicated taxonomic recognition. Additionally, incomplete descriptions and difficult identification of characteristics in the name-bearing type specimens demonstrate the need to revisit the species and revise the two genera. Herein, we broaden the description of Latipes erinaceus Colosi, 1922 with respect to the circulatory system, the radula, the jaw, the position of entry of the ligation duct in the bursa copulatrix in relation to the canal of the bursa, the origin of the muscle of the penial gland, along with the morphometric characteristics of the phallus, the penial gland, the pedal gland, and the bursa copulatrix. We also propose new differential diagnoses for the genera Angustipes and Latipes, limited to the essential characteristics that enable taxonomic recognition. Hence, we propose the assignment of the species L. erinaceus, Latipes rosilus (Thiele, 1927), Latipes ribeirensis (Thiele, 1927), and Latipes absumptus (Colosi, 1921) to the genus Angustipes, based on the presence of morpho- logical characteristics attributable to this genus, such as the phallus being short and conical; the bursa copulatrix being sessile or short, and lacking a head; the ligation duct inserted near the canal of the bursa; as well as on the similarity in phallus morphology with Angustipes difficilis Colosi, 1922, the type species of this genus“.

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The family Veronicellidae is notoriously enigmatic due to the need to use anatomical charcters for classification. This paper is thus a welcome addition to the literature of this family.
Reference:
Rocha, C.A. & D’ávila, S., 2019. New Morphological Characterization of Latipes erinaceus (Gastropoda, Veronicellidae), Differential Diagnosis for the Genera Angustipes and Latipes, and Novel Combinations for Species of Latipes. – Zoological Science (Tokyo), 36 (3):231-241.

A misidentified prey

In 2002 R. Williams published a brief note on a bird, the Scaled Fruiteater Ampeliodes tschudii, which had been observed near Tandayapa in Ecuador with a snail in its beak.

 

According to information given to him by a third person, only two species of terrestrial snail were living in that area: “the arboreal Plekocheilus sp. and a large terrestrial form in the family Pleurodontidae [now Labyrinthidae]”. Mr. Williams concluded that it must have been the Plekocheilus species that was caught by the bird.

Apart from the obvious errors in the sentence quoted above (both snails are terrestrial, and Plekocheilus species are not truly arboreal), it is clear from the picture provided in the note and copied above that the prey was misidentified. The shell in the bird’s beak look definitely like a Drymaeus species and the most likely candidate is Drymaeus aequatorianus (E.A. Smith, 1877) which is known from that region.

Reference:
Williams, R.S.R., 2002. Consumption of arboreal snails by Scaled Fruiteater Ampeliodes tschudii. – Cotinga, 18: 100.